BGP breaks 300,000

By stretch | Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 3:05 p.m. UTC

Around the turn of the month, the global BGP IPv4 routing table broke the 300,000-route barrier.

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The good news is that this growth will more or less plateau when we run out of IPv4 networks. Graphs courtesy of bgp.potaroo.net.

About the Author

Jeremy Stretch is a network engineer living in the Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina area. He is known for his blog and cheat sheets here at Packet Life. You can reach him by email or follow him on Twitter.

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Comments


Dirk (guest)
August 4, 2009 at 3:27 p.m. UTC

Do you think it will plateau when the IPv4 space is exhausted? I think people will become more creative with their addressing needs and that it will grow even further because of smaller subnets being advertised.


Scott (guest)
August 4, 2009 at 6:37 p.m. UTC

I wonder how much money Cisco has been making on router memory upgrades in the last few years. I know I've had to do a router replacement and a RAM upgrade over the last few years, just to deal with the BGP tables growth.


Michael Janke (guest)
August 5, 2009 at 12:21 a.m. UTC

I'd also bet that the growth will continue after address exhaustion. There will not be many options other than dividing up what we have into smaller subnets.


Tacack (guest)
August 6, 2009 at 6:20 a.m. UTC

I like your statement " when IPv4 runs out " :) It's like...we won't have to worry about keeping your girl happy if you've already been dumped.


Tim Carey (guest)
August 7, 2009 at 3:38 p.m. UTC

Thanks for this information, It is agreed that it should flatten out as IPv4 runs short. Has our industry began to decide if with IPv6 their will be ownership of IPv6 space, or will it be monitored still by the authoritys, ARIN, etc..


Ivan
October 1, 2009 at 4:53 p.m. UTC

The BGP growth rate will NOT flatten out. Every multihomed customer creates at least one entry (usually 2-3 due to load balancing ideas) in the global BGP table.

When IPv4 space runs out, people with /16's will start selling them in /24 chunks. Furthermore, IPv6 prefixes will start appearing in the BGP table, approximately doubling it just to get us all into the dual-stack phase of the transition.


jbothe
November 10, 2009 at 12:32 a.m. UTC

Funny you mention that... My director came to me the other day and asked if we really need all of our /16... I was like, WTF?!?! I guess $$$ are on the brain.


bgp admin (guest)
June 20, 2011 at 5:50 p.m. UTC

At this moment I have more than 350,000 prefixes.

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